Pond mother bleeping peacefully

15 11 2015

I’ve been researching family history, following leads in the National Library of Australia’s ‘Trove’ digital newspaper collection. One of the great things about this collection is that in addition to the scanned images of the newspapers, they’ve also been converted to text using OCR (optical character recognition).

Anyone who’s scanned text using OCR will know that the resulting text is hit and miss — the accuracy depends on the state of the original document/image, the OCR software, and the settings you use when converting. And so it is with these images — some are good, some are great, some are just woeful. Anyone can correct the resulting text, and with many people doing just that, over time the text becomes more readable — and most importantly, correctly represented in the indexes used for searching.

As I’m doing family history research, I’m looking for dates of birth, marriage, and death, so some of the entries I read are heartbreaking. Others are just plain funny because the OCR has incorrectly translated certain letter forms to other letters — e.g. F to P, i to l, H to II, S to B, 8 to S etc.

Although this one was not part of my family, I corrected it anyway. This is before…

pond_mother

 





Safari suits – not just a 1970s fashion statement!

15 11 2015

I’ve been researching family history, following leads in the National Library of Australia’s ‘Trove’ digital newspaper collection. While looking at the 1948 Leaving Certificate results (published January 1949), I spotted this advertisement for safari suits and other summer men’s wear.

(Click the image to view it larger)

safari_suits

I always thought the safari suit was fashionable in colonial India and Africa, and then later in the late 1960s/70. I didn’t realise it was fashionable for Australian men in the late 1940s! And look at those tight whities!





Community Quilt 239

15 11 2015

This bright colourful quilt was lots of white space, some applique, and a patterned fabric that looked like it was applique.

How to quilt it? I started by stitching in the ditch around all the blocks, applique pieces, and borders to stabilise it. I then echo quilted the appliqued and fake applique pieces, and did a stipple in the white space behind the fake applique blocks. In the setting triangles, I stitched a very simple fleur de lis type of motif, and then just some wavy lines in the borders. I left all the green sashing strips unstitched.

(Click on a photo to view it larger)

quilt239_01

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Threads used:

  • Top: Fil-Tec Glide ‘White’ (40 wt, trilobal polyester, colour 10000)
  • Bottom: Fil-Tec Magna Glide Classic pre-wound bobbin (white)

Photos of all the Community Quilts I’ve quilted are here: http://www.flickr.com/photos/rhondamadeit/sets/72157630291250200/





Community Quilt 238

15 11 2015

How to quilt this bright quilt?

I decided on stylised flowers, starting with a couple of arcs, then tracking back with rounded ‘petals’ and an echo, before starting a new ‘flower’. This is a variation on the open headband motif that I’ve done many times before.

The thread was a variegated pink, even though it’s called ‘Mauve’, which is a light purple where I come from!

(Click on a photo to view it larger)

quilt238_01

quilt238_02
quilt238_03

 

Threads used:

  • Top: Fil-Tex Affinity ‘Mauve’ (40 wt, trilobal polyester, colour 60149)
  • Bottom: Fil-Tec Magna Glide Classic pre-wound bobbin (white)

Photos of all the Community Quilts I’ve quilted are here: http://www.flickr.com/photos/rhondamadeit/sets/72157630291250200/





Community Quilt 237

15 11 2015

This large quilt was full of autumnal colours, and a striking piece of backing fabric.

I was almost tempted to turn the quilt over and follow the design of the backing fabric for the quilting. However, I decided not to, instead stitching in the ditch along all the diagonal seams, then stitching large looping ribbon candy in the lighter coloured diagonal bands, leaving the darker bands unstitched.

For the border, I emulated the ribbon candy stitching really large loops of it to hold the layers together. The border fabric was very busy, so there was no point in doing anything too elaborate in it as it would be lost.

(Click on a photo to view it larger)

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Back:

quilt237_04

Threads used:

  • Top: Fil-Tec Harmony ‘Tweed’ (40 wt, cotton, colour 14076)
  • Bottom: Fil-Tec Magna Glide Classic pre-wound bobbin (light tan)

Photos of all the Community Quilts I’ve quilted are here: http://www.flickr.com/photos/rhondamadeit/sets/72157630291250200/





Community Quilt 236

15 11 2015

What a pretty quilt this was! I loved the colour combination of aqua and grey. And looking at it closely, it was made with a simple pattern I’ve used in a couple of recent quilts (https://rhondabracey.com/2015/09/07/baby-quilt-kaffe-fassett-fabrics/ and https://rhondabracey.com/2015/09/28/baby-quilt-with-tonga-treasures-fabric/).

How to quilt it? I wanted to something not quite floral, but not geometric either. I thought about big spirals, then decided to do a motif I haven’t done for a while — a spiral that comes out with rounded arms. It looks a bit like a flower, but it isn’t; it could also be a stylised Aboriginal motif. Anyhow, I thought it worked well with the quilt top design and colours.

For the border, I continued with the aqua thread and the rounded arms from the main motif, stitching elongated ‘u’ shapes of various widths.

(Click on a photo to view it larger)

quilt236_04

quilt236_03

quilt236_01

Back:

quilt236_02

Threads used:

  • Top: Robison-Anton ‘Mint Julep’ (40 wt, rayon, colour 2310)
  • Bottom: Fil-Tec Magna Glide Classic pre-wound bobbin (white)

Photos of all the Community Quilts I’ve quilted are here: http://www.flickr.com/photos/rhondamadeit/sets/72157630291250200/