Fighting and winning a battle

26 08 2019

I won a battle today. It involved a lot of fighting, a side skirmish to deal with a breakaway patch, some criss-crossing of the very wide field of battle, zigging and zagging from the enemy, attacking in straight lines, going forwards then backwards, rearranging my troops (and many didn’t want to be rearranged so coercion was involved), fraying around the edges as some of the troops got away, some pushing, pulling and tugging, but I PREVAILED!!!

Why, yes, I was patching a centre part of a fitted king-size sheet where a hole had emerged. What did you think I was talking about?





Community Quilts 460 to 462

28 07 2019

Here’s the latest batch of quilts I quilted for the West Australian Quilters Association’s Community Quilts program.

(Click on a photo to view it larger)

Community Quilt 460

Community Quilt 461

Community Quilt 462

Photos of all the Community Quilts I’ve quilted are here: http://www.flickr.com/photos/rhondamadeit/sets/72157630291250200/





Community Quilts 453 to 459

14 07 2019

Here’s the latest batch of quilts I quilted for the West Australian Quilters Association’s Community Quilts program. I lost my quilting mojo for a couple of months, but it seems to be back! Number 459 is from a quilt top I made in January, all from scraps, many of which came from offcuts of previous Community Quilts.

(Click on a photo to view it larger)

Community Quilt 453

Community Quilt 454

Community Quilt 455

 

Community Quilt 456

Community Quilt 457

 

Community Quilt 458

Community Quilt 459

Photos of all the Community Quilts I’ve quilted are here: http://www.flickr.com/photos/rhondamadeit/sets/72157630291250200/





Quilt for sweet baby James

14 04 2019

I have a new grand great nephew! (Aside: Why isn’t it ‘grand nephew’? If my sister is the grandmother and my mother is the great grandmother, then why aren’t I a grand aunt? Why does that relationship get called ‘great’ instead of ‘grand’? Aha! I just looked it up and I *can* [and should] be a grand aunt: https://www.familytreemagazine.com/articles/news-blogs/now-what/aunts-and-uncles-grand-not-great/)

James was born almost a year ago, and was recently adopted by my nephew and his husband. Of course, a new child means a new quilt! When I asked, they said his nursery was in tones of greys and blues, with elephants a big theme. So an elephant quilt it was — I even had some fabric printed with tiny elephants that I used for the appliqued elephants.

 

Wide vertical strips of various grey fabrics, split by two yellow horizontal strips, with appliqued elephants

Wide vertical strips of various grey fabrics, split by two yellow horizontal strips, with appliqued elephants

In the panel between the two yellow strips, I stitched a row of elephants

In the panel between the two yellow strips, I stitched a row of elephants

Above the topmost yellow strip, I quilted stylised suns, representing the harsh heat of an African summer

Above the topmost yellow strip, I quilted stylised suns, representing the harsh heat of an African summer

For the quilting, I did narrow wavy lines with grasses popping up every so often to represent the ground below the elephants, followed by wider wavy lines representing heat haze, then spiky lines representing mountains in the distance

For the quilting, I did narrow wavy lines with grasses popping up every so often to represent the ground below the elephants, followed by wider wavy lines representing heat haze, then spiky lines representing mountains in the distance.

Another picture showing the quilting. You can just see the tiny elephants on the fabric used for the appliqued elephants.

Another picture showing the quilting. You can just see the tiny elephants on the fabric used for the appliqued elephants.

I stitched continuous 'u' shapes in the yellow strips. They have no particular meaning.

I stitched continuous ‘u’ shapes in the yellow strips. They have no particular meaning.

I used an animal alphabet fabric for the backing

I used an animal alphabet fabric for the backing

And of course, the animal alphabet backing fabric had 'E for elephant'!

And of course, the animal alphabet backing fabric had ‘E for elephant’!





Sophie Standing Workshop: March 2019: Kookaburra

18 03 2019

I had the privilege of attending another 4-day workshop with textile artist, Sophie Standing. Last time (2017) we did a shell; this time, it was a kookaburra. I enjoyed the kookaburra more, as we could inject quite a lot of personality into its face (especially the eye) and body. Although some people used some pretty ‘out there’ fabrics, I always intended my kookaburra to be fairly realistic in its colours. So I chose fabrics that emulated its natural colours, as far as possible.

We all had quite a bit of prep to do before the workshop—in my case, that meant painting the background (leaves, flowers, branches, and a background wash over the blue duck fabric I used [note to anyone else doing something similar: check if the fabric is waterproof/water resistant! Mine was, so I had a hard time getting the background wash to take hold; the branches etc. I did with acrylics with a dry brush and no water in the mix, and they worked out much better). This was a residential workshop, so we could work as much as we wanted outside class time too. We stayed at Avalon Homestead about 5km outside Toodyay, Western Australia, which has two purpose-built crafting rooms, and 16 en suite bedrooms. Three yummy meals a day were part of the workshop fee too.

The photos below (click on an individual photo to see the detail) are just a selection of the ones I took showing the progress of my kookaburra—the full set is in this Flickr album: https://www.flickr.com/photos/rhondamadeit/albums/72157707423447255

The original photo of the kookaburra (permission was obtained from the photographer to use it)

The original photo of the kookaburra (permission was obtained from the photographer to use it)

My initial fabric choices; these changed a bit over the four days

My initial fabric choices; these changed a bit over the four days

Initial cutting, pinning, and placing fabric onto the background and drawing

Initial cutting, pinning, and placing fabric onto the background and drawing

We started stitching the beak by the end of Day 1

We started stitching the beak by the end of Day 1

Stitching the eye was the first task on Day 2

Stitching the eye was the first task on Day 2

Next came the head feathers and shading detail

Next came the head feathers and shading detail

Stitched tail feathers

Stitched tail feathers

Bird is all stitched, but the line between dark and light on the body was too harsh so I added large cream flowers to soften it

Bird is all stitched, but the line between dark and light on the body was too harsh so I added large cream flowers to soften it

The claws were fun to do, and, to place the bird properly on the branch, I did quite a lot of black stitching on the branch to blend the joins

The claws were fun to do, and, to place the bird properly on the branch, I did quite a lot of black stitching on the branch to blend the joins

The kookaburra is finished! Notice that the yellow flower fabric on the neck is now gone. I added a small cream and apricot Liberty print to cover it and stitched over it to blend it in. The shiny blue fabric was some lycra I picked up in the dance fabrics section

The kookaburra is finished! Notice that the yellow flower fabric on the neck is now gone. I added a small cream and apricot Liberty print to cover it and stitched over it to blend it in. The shiny blue fabric was some lycra I picked up in the dance fabrics section

I stitched the outlines and central veins of the painted leaves, the flowers, and the small branches

I stitched the outlines and central veins of the painted leaves, the flowers, and the small branches

End of Day 4. A flock of kookaburras!

End of Day 4. A flock of kookaburras!

I had a bit of time left on Day 4, so decided to try stitching a large eye. I chose a cat's eye and used about 20 different coloured threads to create this eye, which is about 2 inches high and 3 inches wide.

I had a bit of time left on Day 4, so decided to try stitching a large eye. I chose a cat’s eye and used about 20 different coloured threads to create this eye, which is about 2 inches high and 3 inches wide.

I had heaps of fun doing this class, and it reinforced how much I like thread painting. I really should do more of it.





Community Quilts 445 to 452

3 03 2019

Here’s the latest batch of quilts I quilted for the West Australian Quilters Association’s Community Quilts program. The first three are from quilt tops I made in January, all from scraps, many of which came from offcuts of previous Community Quilts.

(Click on a photo to view it larger)

Community Quilt 445

Community Quilt 446

 

 

Community Quilt 447

 

Community Quilt 448

 

Community Quilt 449

Community Quilt 450

 

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Community Quilt 451

 

Community Quilt 452

Photos of all the Community Quilts I’ve quilted are here: http://www.flickr.com/photos/rhondamadeit/sets/72157630291250200/





Retreat with friends

20 01 2019

Early in January, I went on a 4-day quilting/sewing retreat with some friends. During that time I made a jelly roll rug (my first ever!), and four quilt tops. The jelly roll colours were much more vibrant than the photo shows. The jelly roll fabric was from the ‘Pastiche’ range by Jason Yenter, In The Beginning Fabrics (http://www.inthebeginningfabrics.com/ and http://www.inthebeginningfabrics.com/shop/c/p/Pastiche-Strip-Rolls-x28221827.htm).

The jelly roll instructions I used/modified are here: http://www.confessionsofahomeschooler.com/blog/2018/06/jelly-roll-rug-tips-and-tutorial.html, with an accompanying 22-minute YouTube video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Y8xblarkuBg

 

Three of the quilt tops are simple — each took me about 4 hours from scrap fabric to a finished top, with borders. Each cut piece is 6.5 x 3.5 inches.

The other (pink one) was a scrappy improv quilt, where I take bits of sort of matching fabric scraps and sew them together, until I end up with other pieces of fabric that I can cut into blocks—in this case, 12.5 inch blocks. Then I added sashing strips and a border. This sort of improv quilt takes much longer than the simple scrappy ones, but it’s a good way to use up smaller scraps.

We all worked on our own projects, in that comfortable silence that good friends have. These retreats are good for my soul!

Look at this amazing wolf Jo made from a Violet Craft pattern!

And Carol has decided that usual sized hexies just aren’t enough (I can’t even do those!), so she does miniature ones! I think she’s mad!!