Community Quilt 361

31 12 2017

How to quilt this quilt? As usual, I started by stitching the ditch around all the main blocks and elements. For the border, I did a large meandering stipple, with stars in the corner squares. In the main top, the busy fabrics leant themselves to a simple motif — I chose my ‘go to’ open headband motif, using red thread.

(Click on a photo to view it larger)

Threads used:

  • Top: Robison-Anton ‘Tuxedo Red’ (40 wt, rayon, colour 2420)
  • Bottom: Fil-Tec Magna Glide Classic pre-wound bobbin (candy apple)

Photos of all the Community Quilts I’ve quilted are here: http://www.flickr.com/photos/rhondamadeit/sets/72157630291250200/





Community Quilt 360

31 12 2017

This small, bright scrappy quilt should cheer up a child in hospital. It had a soft flannel backing too, so will be nice and cuddly. I kept the quilting simple, but reasonably dense because the variety of fabrics used resulted in quite a few wonky seams and puckers.

(Click on a photo to view it larger)

Back:

Threads used:

  • Top: Gutermann Sulky ‘Dandelion’ (40 wt, viscose, colour 1187)
  • Bottom: Fil-Tec Magna Glide Classic pre-wound bobbin (light tan)

Photos of all the Community Quilts I’ve quilted are here: http://www.flickr.com/photos/rhondamadeit/sets/72157630291250200/





Community Quilt 359

31 12 2017

I liked this quilt, though it was a bit of a challenge to quilt because it was quite wonky. The reason this quilt top was so wonky was because the maker had used all sorts of plaid shirting fabrics + denim to make it — those different fabrics had different thicknesses and ‘hand’, resulting in the fabric reacting in different ways to being sewn. This was not the maker’s fault – it’s just a consequence of using widely varying fabrics.

But those wonky seams and the puckering in this quilt top needed to be tamed — either by ironing them out or stitching them out. I chose the ‘stitch it out’ method because I didn’t think ironing would’ve worked in the long term. This meant I needed to use fairly dense stitching to beat those puckers into submission 🙂 To achieve this end, I decided to quilt it using a ‘square meander’, crossing lines to form sort of rectangular shapes. And yes, I tamed it!

(Click on a photo to view it larger)

Back:

Threads used:

  • Top: Madeira ‘Country Kitchen Blue’ (40 wt, rayon, colour 1028)
  • Bottom: Fil-Tec Magna Glide Classic pre-wound bobbin (lead gray)

Photos of all the Community Quilts I’ve quilted are here: http://www.flickr.com/photos/rhondamadeit/sets/72157630291250200/





Community Quilt 358

31 12 2017

This was a pretty pink and green quilt. I started by stitching in the ditch around the main blocks and borders, then did straight lines in the border, following (approximately) the lines formed by the squares in the fabric’s pattern. I quilted the main part of the quilt top with a flower variation on the open headband motif — instead of an arc for the final layer, I stitched half shells, emulating flower petals.

(Click on a photo to view it larger)

 

Threads used:

  • Top: Superior Rainbows ‘Wedding Bells’ (40 wt, trilobal polyester, colour 818)
  • Bottom: Fil-Tec Magna Glide Classic pre-wound bobbin (white)

Photos of all the Community Quilts I’ve quilted are here: http://www.flickr.com/photos/rhondamadeit/sets/72157630291250200/





Farewell, good and faithful servant

26 12 2017

We bought a new car earlier this month to replace my husband’s car. We didn’t need to, but decided to do so for several reasons:

  • None of us is getting any younger, and getting into and out of standard cars starts to become an issue as you age and your joints start to ache. We’re not there yet, but no doubt will be some day.
  • Car technology has advanced in leaps and bounds in the 20 years since my husband bought his last car, and if we’d kept that car for another 10 years, there’d be 30 years of technological advances to have to learn with any new car he bought. Better to bite the bullet and trade up into a more modern car now while we are in control of the learning curve than to be forced to if the old one broke down and wasn’t worth repairing.
  • His 20-year old car was starting to cost us — we’d had the engine mounts replaced in the past year, and a few other things. And the cost of the annual insurance was almost as much as the value of the car too! His new car’s insurance is actually LESS than that for his old car.

He traded his 1998 model Mazda 626 Classic Sedan for a Mazda CX-5 Touring model. And it’s very nice!!!!

In the almost 20 years (April 1998 to December 2017) he had the 626, he drove 183,466 km in it (114,000 miles). At least 70% of those kilometres were driven in the first 10 years when we lived in Perth and he was commuting to work. The car didn’t get driven as much once he retired and we moved to the country in 2007. But it was a good and faithful servant, giving us basically no bother at all. It was sad to say goodbye to it, but we’ve stuck with Mazda as our previous experience with the brand has been very good (I had a Mazda Astina from 1997 to 2012 and only changed because I had an offer ‘too good to refuse’ to purchase my current car).

Here’s hoping the CX-5 also gives us 20 years of great service.





Busy as a beaver

23 12 2017

The first two weeks of December were super busy. In addition to my normal work, these things happened — some planned, some not — many of which required tradies in and out of the house:

  • two weekends away (Albany, Busselton)
  • leak from HWS tank (fixed under warranty)
  • air con balance FINALLY fixed (it took 2 years and multiple visits to find the problem!; under warranty)
  • extractor fan motor in rangehood died; replaced
  • plumber to find out why no water was getting to the shed (retic guys had switched something they shouldn’t have when they were here in Nov)
  • alarm guy to install 3G to connect to the monitoring centre instead of landline (NBN means no landline extensions)
  • data cabler to install extra data points, check/terminate extension phone lines in prep for NBN, and install mobile phone signal booster
  • new modem configuration for NBN (and a new USB/ethernet adaptor ‘cos recent laptops don’t have LAN connections)
  • removal and relocation of all visible extension phone lines connecting the multifunction printer/fax, landline, etc. (involved lots of work behind fixed cabinets and on the floor on my back with a headlamp to find and remove/relocate the phone cables)
  • issues with PCs (independent of NBN)
  • NBN switchover
  • roof vents installed (and other work by handyman)
  • the yellow toner in the laser printer blew out, spewing yellow powder inside the printer
  • bought a new car (Mazda CX-5) to replace DH’s 20 y.o. Mazda 626, so that’s been a steep learning curve too — there have been a LOT of technological advances in cars in the past 20 years!
  • booked flights and initial other travel stuff for a trip to the US for a conference and tour next Oct/Nov
  • negotiated renewal of current contract plus a new contract with another company (subsea pipeline engineering).





Crazy beach!

8 12 2017

I used a pattern from Four Paws Quilting, called ‘Not So Crazy‘, to make this quilt from a heap of beige scrap fabrics. I added some aqua scrap fabrics as well, and some brownish ones. As I was putting it together, I realised that the colours reminded me of the beaches near where I live — white/beige sand, aqua water, brown seaweed washed up on shore, colourful umbrellas (the stripe fabric), swimsuits (dotted fabric), and eating fish and chips at the beach (the chips/fries fabric and the newspaper fabric). The name ‘Crazy Beach’ comes from that, plus a play on words…

I added an aqua border to the quilt top and finished it with a beige binding. For the quilting, I stitched undulating lines (representing waves) across the quilt, leaving some areas unquilted (the calmer water between the waves). In the border I stitched a very stylised up-and-down scallop shell motif I made up. The back is a soft Egyptian cotton in a mid-beige.

Back: